Welcome to The International Association for the Study of Popular Music UK and Ireland Branch

IASPM UK&I London Calling Conference

Posted: May 18th, 2020 | Filed under: IASPM Conferences, News | No Comments »

IMPORTANT INFO FOR THOSE PLANNING TO ATTEND THE ONLINE CONFERENCE:

  1. If you haven’t registered on Eventbrite by 5pm UK time on Monday 18th May (Click Here To Register) we can’t guarantee we can process you in time for the first keynote on Tuesday with Mykaell Riley – although you will still be able to watch it on the website – just not participate in the discussion. You can continue to register after that and we will process people as quickly as we can.
  2. On Tuesday morning we will email everyone who has registered with the conference login details. People who register later will be emailed separately.
  3. We can only let 100 people into the keynote Zoom sessions but you can also watch the session live on the website and use the comments section to ask questions. (There are nearly 200 people registered at the moment and still rising). Details of the ‘door policy’ for the Zoom session will be announced in the login email on Tuesday morning.
  4. Every week there will be some streamed performances after the keynote and, for the most part, they are musicians without other income so please support them by contributing something through the PayPal.Me links under the YouTube Live screens on the website.

The website for the event is here: https://london-calling-iaspm2020.com


Regional experiences and external influences: reclaiming identities by popular music in the digital era

Posted: March 5th, 2020 | Filed under: Calls for Papers, IASPM Conferences | No Comments »

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń and International Association for the Study of Popular Music
Toruń, Poland June 18-20, 2020

Conference website: https://iaspm2020torun.wixsite.com/website

The main objective of the conference is to exchange the experiences of studying popular music regional scenes. Such panorama tends to functionally and structurally reflect the specific and diversified character of cultural regionalism itself, including music and its social functions. We shall examine local popular music scenes in three varied but overlapping perspectives located mainly in the fields of musicology, sociology, anthropology, literary studies, cultural studies, political science, but we do not limit the academic areas of research. Thus, the experts of the enumerated fields covering the research on popular music are welcome.

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Transformational POP

Posted: February 26th, 2020 | Filed under: Calls for Papers, IASPM Conferences | No Comments »

Transitions, Breaks, and Crises in Popular Music (Studies)
4th Biennial IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22–24 October 2020

Paderborn University/Germany, Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Department of Music – Popular Music and Media

Organizational Committee: IASPM D-A-CH Executive Committee and Advisory Board +  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Beate Flath, Prof. Dr. Christoph Jacke, Manuel Troike (Local hosts)

Pop music cultures, in their entire breadth, are seismographs of social, political, economic, ecological, media, artistic, and technological transformations. In and through them, fields of tensions, disruptions, and lines of conflict become not only visible, audible and perceptible, but also communicable and thus, negotiable. Economic and ecological crises, social structural changes, political shifts, communicative-media discourses, atmospheric moods, and disturbances of the most diverse kind cannot be appreciated in isolation from specific sounds, performances, lyrics, images, stars, genres, etc. Therefore, these are always changing in the process: pop music cultures transform and are themselves transformed. “Pop is transformational, always. It is a dynamic movement in which cultural materials and its social environments mutually reshape each other, crossing previously fixed boundaries: class boundaries, ethnic boundaries or cultural boundaries [own translation].“ (Diedrich Diederichsen, Pop – deskriptiv, normativ, emphatisch (1996). In: Charis Goer, Stefan Greif, Christoph Jacke (Eds.): Texte zur Theorie des Pop, 2013: 188)

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IASPM-ANZ 2020

Posted: January 22nd, 2020 | Filed under: Calls for Papers, IASPM Conferences | No Comments »

The UTS School of Communication is pleased to host the 2020 International Association for the Study of Popular Music, Australia and New Zealand branch (IASPM-ANZ) conference.

The conference aims to provoke discussion and debate on hierarchies within popular music. These hierarchies might exist within and between popular music genres and be experienced by artists, audiences and scholars. We refer to these hierarchies as ‘scales’ which can be interpreted in a number of different ways. Scales can refer to the construction of music, or it can mean scales of class, genre, taste and so on.

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Big Sounds from Small Places

Posted: October 29th, 2019 | Filed under: Calls for Papers, IASPM Conferences | No Comments »

IASPM Canada Annual Conference 2020 Call For Papers
Cape Breton University: Sydney, Nova Scotia
12 – 14 June 2020
Submission Deadline: 15 December 2019

As we enter into a new decade it’s apt to question our place in the world. Almost sixty years ago, Marshall McLuhan notably coined the term Global Village to refer to the global spread of media content and consumption, and yet Canada still struggles with its position in the world as an imposing landmass with a relatively small population, and how that influences where and how its cultural texts are encountered. This conference seeks to address the concept of voice and sound as tied to space and place, in the broadest sense. In regards to popular music in Canada, we have established a strong identity, but one that is often defined in opposition to our more vocal neighbours to the South. As we continuously define and redefine Canadian cultural identity, and cultural outputs, this conference questions how our musical landscape has historically adapted, and will continue to adapt, to an increasingly globalized environment.

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