Welcome to The International Association for the Study of Popular Music UK and Ireland Branch

Musical Creation in the Soundtrack

Posted: January 22nd, 2021 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

XIII International Symposium

The Music and Audiovisual Languages Commission of the Spanish Society of Musicology (SEDEM), reminds about the upcoming 13th Symposium “Musical creation in the soundtrack”, on June 25-26, 2021.
All the information and the Call for Papers can be checked on our website:
https://mylasedem.wixsite.com/sedem-myla/xiii-simposio

We look forward to your participation. The thirteenth edition of the symposium will be carried out online due to the unpredictable situation with the corona pandemic.

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Punk Passages: Punk, Ageing and Time

Posted: January 14th, 2021 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

Writers are invited to submit chapter proposals for an edited collection of work exploring ageing, time and temporality in the context of punk.

Initial academic consideration of punk posited it as a youth culture and the positioning of punk in relation to time and historical location is of course commonplace in scholarship. This can be seen outside of academia too, for example the ‘celebration’ of the 40th anniversary of punk and the associated events which took place highlight the way punk is often link with a particular time in our collective memory. Just as punk scholarship has endeavoured to deal with the notion of punk retaining significance in individuals’ lives ‘post-youth’, empirical work has built around how punk is remembered and represented. And yet…tensions, issues and gaps remain unaddressed.

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Ecologies of Sound

Posted: January 14th, 2021 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

The Music and Sound Studies Network of the German Studies Association (GSA) invites proposals from scholars for panels at the 45th Annual Conference in Indianapolis, IN, from September 30 – October 3, 2021. We welcome proposals that consider how ecologies of sound have manifested themselves in German-speaking communities or German spaces throughout the world, and the ways in which these relations, patterns or systems have evolved and developed over time. The network supports scholarship from a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches and welcomes projects that focus on noise and sound as much as on music. The network also encourages either completed research or more speculative, tentative and preliminary hypotheses. In addition, the network hopes to build on last year’s format by having slightly shorter papers to ensure more time for discussion. Some potential considerations to guide proposal submissions may be: Read the rest of this entry »


European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity

Posted: January 12th, 2021 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

Special issue of Danish Musicology Online
Editors: Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen and Mikkel Vad

Since the 1980s, questions of identity markers such as gender, race, and class, have become a central focus of research and academic debates in areas such as musicology, ethnomusicology, musical anthropology and sociology, popular music studies, and many more. In the wake of Philip Ewell’s article on “Music Theory and the White Racial Frame” (2020), such longstanding conversations have been amplified while gaining new momentum in the areas of music theory and music analysis.

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Beyond the Avant-Garde? Rethinking the Vanguard in British Music since 1970

Posted: January 11th, 2021 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

1-day online symposium, 25 June 2021, hosted by Goldsmiths and the University of Manchester
Convenors: Dr Stephen Graham (Goldsmiths) and Dr Roddy Hawkins (University of Manchester)

‘The centre of gravity of exploratory music making in the West shifted to a significant degree in the 1970s and 1980s. Included in but not contained by postmodern rubble revelling and high/low jockeying, this shift saw the classic modernist drive towards radical expression jump lanes. Or, rather, spread across a number of lanes. Noise musicians in Tokyo, ‘free’ players in Berlin and London, and industrial post-punk provocateurs in Sheffield, L.A. or Rome could now legitimately claim to be amongst the vanguard of radical music. Quasi-‘popular’ cultural practices such as these became routes into the new and the strange, as valid as any other’ (Graham 2019).

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