Welcome to The International Association for the Study of Popular Music UK and Ireland Branch

Music and fascism 33 1/3 Europe

Posted: July 1st, 2024 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | Comments Off on Music and fascism 33 1/3 Europe

This is a brief and informal call for expressions of interest in contributing a book related to the evolving far-right for the 33 1/3 Europe book series.

Far-right nationalist (or fascist?) parties are rising across Europe. They won big enough in the elections for the European Parliament earlier this month to move the needle in the continent’s most powerful institution in the coming years. The relationship between music and politics cannot be conceived only or primarily in direct and causal terms. The two intersect in various ways—artists are sensitive to aspects of political culture, music is entangled in spaces and counter-spaces of fascism, and affective flows in political culture have a sonic dimension. There’s been a surge of interest in this topic. A research team in Germany and the Netherlands (involving the great Mario Dunkel and Melanie Schiller among others) has produced important research on music in rightwing populism. A CFP for a book titled “The Rising Right” was announced on this list a few days ago.

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Listening to Mainstream Popular Music in Europe: A Snapshot from the Early 2020s

Posted: July 1st, 2024 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | Comments Off on Listening to Mainstream Popular Music in Europe: A Snapshot from the Early 2020s

Call for Articles: “Popular Music” Special Issue
Guest Editors: Bernhard Steinbrecher, Ondřej Daniel, and Jakub Machek

This special issue takes a comparative, transnational snapshot of popular music, using the idea of the mainstream to examine prevailing aesthetics, acts, and actors within a particular time and place. Specifically, it focuses on mainstream(ing) processes in Europe at the beginning of the second decade of the century. It explores how popular music’s globally circulating sounds and practices have recently been received, adapted, and negotiated in different European contexts against the backdrop of late modern global capitalism (Taylor et al. 2013, p. viii) and dominant (cross-)local conceptions and ideologies.

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