Welcome to The International Association for the Study of Popular Music UK and Ireland Branch

Crises at Work: Potentials for Change? (2021)

Posted: July 13th, 2020 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

Special Issue Editors: Michael Ahlers and Jan Herbst

This Special Issue is motivated by, but not limited to, the current processes and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the global civic rights movement related to “Black Lives Matter”, which highlights systemic racism as an epidemic in many societies around the world. Only a selection of topics is shown here, which is also historically part of personal, systematic or infrastructural crises of popular music cultures. The Special Issue of the IASPM Journal aims to gather a broad range of scholarly and artistic perspectives on crises in popular music composition and production, labour, business, education, societies and cultures.

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The Best Side of Capitalism? The Life, Death, and Afterlife of the Record Store

Posted: July 1st, 2020 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

Gina Arnold, Christine Feldman-Barrett, John Dougan, and Matthew Worley, eds.

This book explores, from a variety of perspectives and methodologies, how record stores became such important locales. As an agora, a community center, and a busy critical forum for taste, culture, and politics, the record store prefigured social media. Once conduits to new music, frequently bypassing the corporate music industry in ways now done more easily via the Internet, independent record stores (in direct opposition to rock radio programmed by corporate interests), championed the most local of economic enterprises, allowing social mobility to well up from them in unexpected ways. In this way, record stores speak volumes about our relationship to shopping, capitalism, and art. The editors of this volume believe that record stores are spaces rife for examination because their cultural history is in some ways the story of the best side of capitalism seen in microcosm. To that end, this book employs three motifs: cultural history, urban geography, and auto-ethnography to find out what individual record stores meant to individual people, but also what they meant to communities, to musical genres, and to society in general. What was their role in shaping social practices, aesthetic tastes, and even, loosely put, ideologies? This book will collect stories and memories, and facts about a variety of local stores that will not only re-center the record store as a marketplace of ideas, but also explore and celebrate a neglected personal history of many lives. Read the rest of this entry »