Welcome to The International Association for the Study of Popular Music UK and Ireland Branch

Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics

Posted: July 31st, 2015 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship invites authors and artists to submit contributions for a special collection on the general topic of Jazz and Comics.

This will be an open access scholarly collection co-edited by Dr Nicolas Pillai (Birmingham City University) and Dr Ernesto Priego (City University London).

We welcome submissions from researchers, artists, graduate students, scholars, teachers, curators, publishers and librarians from any academic, disciplinary or creative background interested in the multidisciplinarystudy and/or practice of comics and jazz.

The popular forms of jazz and comics have shared similar historical and cultural tendencies. As expressions of modernism, they have been subject to the demands of the marketplace and consumed by wide and varied audiences. Yet the liberatory qualities of comics and jazz have provoked concern in moral guardians, particularly in relation to the subcultures they have generated. Recalling Bourdieu, we might note that, within these subcultures, very divergent and often incompatible judgements are fiercely defended (1983: 24). In the 21st century, both jazz and comics are accepted as art forms. However, this elevated cultural position has arguably come at a price, contributing to the restriction of some forms of jazz and comics to specialised spaces of purchase and consumption.

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IASPM UK and Ireland Newsletter No. 31, July 2015

Posted: July 20th, 2015 | Filed under: News | No Comments »

The latest edition of the newsletter of the IASPM UK and Ireland branch, edited by Michalis Poupazis, is now available to download or view online.


Mapping Popular Music in Dublin

Posted: July 14th, 2015 | Filed under: News | No Comments »

A Research Project based at the Department of Music, St Patrick’s College, Dublin City University, funded by Fáilte Ireland

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

Mapping Popular Music in Dublin’ is the first comprehensive research study on popular music in Dublin today, based at St Patrick’s College, Dublin City University and funded by Fáilte Ireland. The project aims to map popular music experience in Dublin by looking at popular music from the viewpoint of fans (citizens and tourists), musicians, and music industry personnel. The purpose is to inform tourism, culture and music industry organisations by providing the first comprehensive overview of popular music experience in Dublin to date.

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Punk NOW!!

Posted: June 18th, 2015 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

29th – 30th October 2015
Birmingham City University

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 31st JULY 2015

CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Dr Alistair Gordon (De Montfort University)
Dr Pete Dale (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Following the dynamic emergence of punk in the UK, USA and Europe in the 1970s, the subculture spread widely. As punk and new wave gained commercial and critical success, together with an attractive notoriety, it soon began an ongoing journey around the globe – both as a product and as an ideology. Punk, then, despite its omnipresence in contemporary underground and popular cultures, is clearly more than legacy music. More than forty years after the proto-punk progenitors of Detroit and New York unconsciously launched an underground revolution, to continue what some of the 60’s and 70’s anarchic counter culture propagated, and after untold premature obituaries, it appears that punk – in terms of music, philosophy, and identity – remains in rude health.

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PopScriptum 12 on Sound, Sexuality, and Sexism

Posted: June 12th, 2015 | Filed under: Calls for Papers | No Comments »

It seems obvious, and not only from an academic perspective, that popular music is highly intertwined with sexuality and gender. The current discussion on this subject is reflected on the one hand in publications that ascribe subversion, androgyny, or queerness to popular music and its protagonists (see Doris Leibetseder, Sheila Whiteley/Jennifer Rycenga) and on the other in an explicit critique of sexist and sexualizing representations of women in the popular music context (see Nicola Dibben, Simon Frith/Angea McRobbie).

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